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2019 Grammy's entertain with stars and drama

by Margaret Stewart - Copy Editor
Tue, Feb 19th 2019 04:00 pm
Shine bright The 2019 Grammy's was one like no other.  This year, rapper Childish Gambino's `This is America` became the first hip-hop song to win song of the year.  The music video (far above) went viral because of hidden messages and recognition of the issues going on in modern day America. The night included a Latino spiced performance by Camilla Cabello (above right). Then, rapper Drake (above left) stated that winning a Grammy should not define success, which caused the program to cut him off.
Shine bright The 2019 Grammy's was one like no other. This year, rapper Childish Gambino's "This is America" became the first hip-hop song to win song of the year. The music video (far above) went viral because of hidden messages and recognition of the issues going on in modern day America. The night included a Latino spiced performance by Camilla Cabello (above right). Then, rapper Drake (above left) stated that winning a Grammy should not define success, which caused the program to cut him off.

People used to watch award shows for the outfits seen on  the red carpet (remember that meat dress) and incredible talent. Now, not only have the shows decreased their viewership, but those who tune in only do so in order to catch the controversies and clap backs that make the headlines the following morning.

In recent years, one of the largest issues facing the industry is the inequality between races and genders. The main undertone of the event-filled night was the criticism facing the Recording Academy.

Most were looking forward to the host of the show, Alicia Keys. However, her calm demeanor became the butt of everyone’s joke.

Regardless, Keys gave one the best performances of the night. Though rumored to be in lieu of Ariana Grande’s last-minute absence, Keys showcased her soulful voice while playing not one, but two pianos and singing classics from Coldplay and her hit song featuring rapper Jay Z, “Empire State of Mind.”

In an interview with Pitchfork, it was noted that Grande’s absence was due to her discontent with the show’s producers, specifically, Ken Ehrlich. Ehrlich claimed Grande “felt it was too late for her to pull something together” for the show.Grande quickly clapped back over Twitter arguing that pulling a show together over night would’ve been no problem.

“I’ve kept my mouth shut but now you’re lying about me,” Grande tweeted. “I can pull together a performance over night and you know that, Ken. It was when my creativity & self-expression was stifled by you, that I decided not to attend.”

Unfortunately, her absence meant that she missed the chance to go up on stage to accept her win. Nevertheless, she tweeted her thanks to her fans along with a picture of herself in the gown she would have worn to the ceremony.

Drake seemed to feel the same way as he told the Academy they don’t matter, seeing as during his acceptance speech they are set up like a popularity contest, so people shouldn’t feel bad if they are not recognized. The show played him off the stage.

Another obvious absence was that of 21 Savage, due to being detained by ICE. Though it was glaringly evident, no one said a word. Most notably, in Post Malone’s performance, he left in “21” which is the cue for 21’s part in the hit song “Rockstar.” It would have been the cue for Savage’s verse had he been in attendance.

When Savage did eventually get mentioned in the four hour program, it was by a Swedish composer, Ludwig Göransson.  He thanked Savage for his participation on the album “This is America” on behalf of Donald Glover.

Speaking of Glover, his hit track “This is America,” became the first hip-hop song to win a Grammy for song of the year. The song, which spoke on many issues regarding America today, became an internet sensation because of its hidden messages and catchy tune.

Controversy continued as Jennifer Lopez performed a tribute to Motown, the record label behind The Supremes and The Jackson 5, among others. Lopez was joined on stage by Alicia Keys, Ne-Yo and Smokey Robinson. Many people questioned why the legendary Latina performer was chosen to lead the tribute rather than any of the incredibly talented African-American artists in the audience.

Robinson made sure to speak up for the artist, saying that anyone angry about her Motown tribute was “stupid.”

“I don’t think anyone who is intelligent is upset,” Robinson said.

While Robinson is undeniably respected when it comes to his music and relation to Motown, many fans are outraged about the lack of proper representation during such an important tribute. In fact, fans took to – where else? – Twitter to express their discontent.

One twitter user, @omyj0sh, responded by saying, “Jennifer Lopez is doing the Motown tribute when Janelle Monáe is right there and I just don’t understand the creative decision.”

Though the Recording Academy tries to prevent politics from entering the spotlight, Camilla Cabello, Ricky Martin, J Balvin and Arturo Sandoval used their platform to promote their political beliefs – aimed directly at the President of the United States. Cabello opened her set titled, “Build Bridges Not Walls.” The night featured a lot of amazing talent including, Shawn Mendes, Dan + Shay and Kacy Musgraves in addition to all of the drama.

Perhaps it is because of the controversy surrounding award shows that their viewership is tanking. Many people feel that the shows should be dedicated to celebrating the artists’ craft and not showcase the artists’ political opinions.

Photo of the Week

Taken by Vinny Croce:
Staff Photographer

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