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Trump pushes to release long awaited JFK files

by Sarah Morris - Copy Editor
Tue, Oct 31st 2017 11:00 pm
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Almost 54 years after the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy, President Donald Trump has released 2,800 files redacted by the government regarding the nation-altering event.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Almost 54 years after the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy, President Donald Trump has released 2,800 files redacted by the government regarding the nation-altering event.
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President Donald Trump’s recent tweet on Saturday, Oct. 21, regarding the JFK Files opened a door of interest on speculations that circle the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy.

“Subject to the receipt of further information, I will be allowing, as President, to the long blocked and classified JFK FILES to be opened,” Trump tweeted.

Nearly 54 years ago, on Nov. 22, 1963, Kennedy was riding in the back of a convertible with his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, during a motorcade in in Dallas, Texas, where he traveled to help Democratic Party funds and promote his reelection campaign for the next year. 

While rounding Dealey Plaza, two bullets hit Kennedy in the neck and back of the head, eventually killing him just twelve minutes after being rushed to the emergency room. 

Back at Dealey Plaza, police were interviewing witnessses. One man and his co-worker at the Texas School Book Depository told police that they heard three gunshots directly over their heads, where the shooter was. When a crowd was addressed, only 52 percent head the shots from the Texas School Book Depository, while others believed they heard shots coming from the Grassy Knoll. 

Lee Harvey Oswald, the man arrested for the assassination, was shot two days after being taken into custody by Jack Ruby, a Dallas nightclub owner, leaving many questions unanswered and opening a door of possibilities and theories regarding why Oswald did it and who he may have worked with.

The most famous conspiracy theory in America, according to Time, questions the motives behind Oswald, and whether or not he worked alone. Two months before the assassination took place, Oswald took a secret, six day trip to Mexico City, where he visited Cuban and Soviet embassies and met with Valeriy Kostikov, a KGB officer. 

There is also conspiracy that the mafia reached all the way down to Mexico City, where Oswald and them worked with soviets. 

On Thursday, Oct. 26, Trump kept his promise and released 2,800 secret JFK Files to the public. 

Perhaps one of the most intriguing documents that was uncovered was a memo from the CIA director to the FBI director about a call the Cambridge News in England received 25 minutes before the assassination of JFK. 

According to CIA director James Angleton, the call said “the Cambridge News reporter should call the American Embassy in London for some big news, and then hung up.” 

Though it’s unclear it was real or a complete coincidental prank, Kennedy conspiracy theorist Michael Eddowes was the one to report the phone call decades ago, believing there’s more behind the call to be investigated. 

Before his death in 1992, Eddowes wrote a book about how he believed a Soviet imposter took the place and identity of Oswald before murdering the president, though the autopsy following Oswald’s death proved that it was, indeed, him. 

Another phone call took place the night before Oswald was killed. Security services received the call from someone speaking in a “calm voice,” warning them of the plan a clandestine committee put together to take out Oswald.

“Last night, we received a call in our Dallas office from a man talking in a calm voice and saying he was a member of a committee organized to kill Oswald,” FBI director J. Edgar Hoover wrote. 

The telegraph goes on to explain the protection they planned on giving Oswald. Despite actions being taken, the Dallas police held the wrong suspect in custody and Oswald was gunned down anyway. 

There are 2,798 more files that hold secrets, important or not, regarding the assassination and what the government has been hiding from us. Throughout the next week or two, more information will be surfacing about the death of John F. Kennedy. 

smorr11@u.brockport.edu

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