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Students get a head start on college career

by Jaymi Gooden - CAMPUS TALK EDITOR
Tue, Feb 28th 2017 09:00 pm
Tara Kiah/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
A Kickstart The College at Brockport has teamed up with the New York State Education Department to create the 3-1-3 Program.  The program serves as a way for eligible students to begin acquiring college credits prior to enrolling as an actual college freshman.
Tara Kiah/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER A Kickstart The College at Brockport has teamed up with the New York State Education Department to create the 3-1-3 Program. The program serves as a way for eligible students to begin acquiring college credits prior to enrolling as an actual college freshman.

 For several years, The College at Brockport's 3-1-3 program has allowed high school students to get a jump start on their futures. Developed several years ago in collaboration with the New York State Education Department, the academic program allows high school seniors to earn up to 30 credits toward the first year of a bachelor's degree before they become full-time college students.

"It gives them a chance to dip their toe in the water," Vice Provost of Academic Affairs Eileen Daniel said. "And it saves their parents a lot of money."

According to the brochure, as the name 3-1-3 suggests, students will attend three years of traditional high school, one year in which the student is simultaneously enrolled at The College at Brockport and his or her respective high school and then three years of traditional college.

Assuming they're in good academic standing after completing high school, 3-1-3 participants are automatically accepted to the college with no need of reapplying. Also, they may utilize the credits earned at other colleges.

The majority of 3-1-3 participants are from Brockport High School but the college's Office of Undergraduate Admissions reviews credentials of recommended students from several area high schools including Spencerport, Albion and the private Northstar Christian Academy. To be eligible, students must successfully complete their junior year of high school, to be enrolled in an advanced placement course and meet Brockport's normal admissions standard. 

Those accepted get a chance to experience challenging upper-level courses in the comfort of an environment they already know.

"They get to be a part of both worlds," Daniel said. "They're slowly getting into college life. They're not living in a dorm but they are taking classes with college students. It gives them a chance to get to know the campus which is much bigger compared to a high school."

In addition to partially immersing themselves in a college atmosphere, students also benefit from the program's affordable cost.

 Students only pay the cost for the SUNY tuition for the two courses taken each semester at the college and any books or materials needed for those courses. There is no tuition or fee charge for the 3-1-3 courses taught at the high school. 

All together, participants pay about 50 percent less than the normal tuition cost at a SUNY college.

A final perk of the 3-1-3 program is the access high school participants have to all of The College at Brockport's facilities, including: the SERC, Tuttle Athletic Complex, the Seymour College Union and Drake Memorial Library. 

3-1-3 is just one in a series of programs offered to tailor toward neighboring high schools. Executive Director of the McNair Program at The College at Brockport Barbara Thompson recently posted on the Daily Eagle looking for college students willing to tutor middle schoolers from the Rochester City School District. 

Tutors are needed for one hour a day from Monday through Wednesday at Northwest College Prep, which is located on the Frederick Douglass Campus in Rochester, NY. 

Brockport's Educational Talent Search Program in affiliation with TRiO programs — a branch of federal outreach and student services programs designed to provide services for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds — offer volunteer hours, internship hours and service-learning hours to Brockport students who are willing to take time out of their schedule to tutor.

"Consider helping a student who needs your knowledge and you as a model of academic success," Thompson wrote on the Daily Eagle. "It can make a big difference in a student's life."

Both 3-1-3 and Brockport Educational Talent Search are just two programs in a series of opportunities aimed at preparing prospective students for the high expectations of collegiate life while making the transition from high school to college as comfortable as possible.

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